Norm Masaji Ibuki

O escritor Norm Masaji Ibuki mora em Oakville, na província de Ontário no Canadá. Ele vem escrevendo com assiduidade sobre a comunidade nikkei canadense desde o início dos anos 90. Ele escreveu uma série de artigos (1995-2004) para o jornal Nikkei Voice de Toronto, nos quais discutiu suas experiências de vida no Sendai, Japão. Atualmente, Norm trabalha como professor de ensino elementar e continua a escrever para diversas publicações.

Atualizado em dezembro de 2009

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Japanese Canadians Remember Internment 80 Years After — Part 2

Read Part 1 >> Masumi Izumi, Fulbright Scholar, 2004-2005; Professor, Faculty of Global and Regional Studies at Doshisha University (Kyoto, Japan) The courage of Japanese Canadians to break the silence about their World War II experiences of the uprooting forever changed the course of Canadian history. It revealed the ominous side of the Canadian past, which is filled with Anglo supremacy, racial violence, exclusion, and the denial that such a past is a part of Canada’s identity. The Redress movement provided an opportunity for Canadians to look back into their history, set …

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Japanese Canadians Remember Internment 80 Years After — Part 1

Happy 80th Anniversary of the 1942 Internment? As I reflect on who to contact for this article about this auspicious anniversary, I think mostly about those who are gone: mom and dad, aunts and uncles, who were innocent kids back in 1942. My Ibuki grandparents who lost their Strawberry Hill farm. On a 2019 visit to that location, it pained me to see the Ibuki farm paved over at a busy Surrey intersection at Scott Road now occupied by BC Hydro towers and two large plazas that have nothing to do with the Ibukis in 2022 who all now reside in Ontario. Of course, each of our internment stories a…

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Canadian Nikkei Artist

Ottawa artist Norman Takeuchi: Long Division Exhibition

“Ever since we both attended the Vancouver School of Art back in the 1950s, I have always respected Norman. He is a creative, seriously dedicated, focused, hard-working and disciplined artist. His work, with many references to two cultures, is constantly changing and growing. It is wonderful that we are both still painting and showing our work in our mid-80s…. We were so young!” —Artist Tsuneko Kokubo (Silverton, BC) whose own Of Light Itself: RetroPERSPECTIVE is now showing at the Langham Gallery, Kaslo, BC Sansei Ottawa artist Norman Kiyomitsu Takeuchi spea…

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Canadian Nikkei Artist

A Nisei and Yonsei: The Power of Art & Isshoni - Part 2

Read Part 1 >> Life After Internment in Edmonton “At age 14, I had no ambitions but once I left the internment camp, I had the good fortune to live in the Misericordia Hospital, as did my sister. We were relief elevator operators for which the nuns provided us with room and board for working on weekends. We were enrolled into Garneau high school, which was across High Level Bridge, a 2 km walk or 10 minutes, by streetcar. Another classmate and I walked daily across the bridge except in winter when in a blizzard the temperature could reach 20 to 30 below; that was cold even at a …

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Canadian Nikkei Artist

A Nisei and Yonsei: The Power of Art & Isshoni - Part 1

The paintings of Dr. Henry Shimizu, retired Edmonton Nisei plastic surgeon, were presented in a show at the University of Victoria’s (UVic) Legacy Gallery entitled Isshoni: Dr. Henry Shimizu’s Paintings of New Denver Internment that brought together Nisei Dr. Shimizu, curators Yonsei Samantha Kuniko Marsh (Vancouver, BC), and Sansei Bryce Kanbara (Hamilton, ON). Well timed during this year, the 80th anniversary of the internment, one might wonder: How are we Japanese Canadians going to remember the internment and, importantly, how do the stories of internment resonate with youn…

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