Norm Masaji Ibuki

Norm Masaji  Ibuki, vive en Oakville, Ontario. Escribió sobre la comunidad Nikkei Canadiense desde los comienzos de 1990. Escribió mensualmente una serie de artículos (1995-2004) para el diario Nikkei Voice (Toronto) donde describía su experiencia en Sendai, Japón. Actualmente, Norm  enseña en la preparataoria y continúa escribiendo para varios publicaciones.

Última actualización en diciembre de 2009

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Kizuna 2020: Nikkei Kindness and Solidarity During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Japanese Canadian Art During Covid-19 - Part 8: British Columbia edition

Read Part 7 >>

After rereading the responses from this chapter’s featured artists from British Columbia, one issue really stands out for me: Canada’s vast geography and how we are divided into two solitudes—east and west—a lasting legacy of the internment.

Vancouver, BC, where our Japanese Canadian story begins, is about 5000 kilometers, a five-day drive, due west from Oakville, Ontario, where I sit now.

As a Toronto-born Sansei, my BC-born parents lived in New Westminster and Vancouver. Growing up, I learned snippets about their lives in Slocan (grandfather Hayashida died there), Bayfarm, Strawberry Hill (Ibuki farm), and Middlechurch, Manitoba, …

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Canadian Nikkei Artist

Hastings Park Revisited with Artist Henry Tsang

I first met artist and professor Henry Tsang back in 2019 at the Powell Street Festival, where he was conducting 360 Riot Walk(ing) tours in the Paueru Gai/Nihonmachi area of Vancouver using iPads and images along the route that white rioters followed in a racist rampage through the Chinatown and Powell Street areas in 1907.

The tour is described as follows: “The Anti-Asian Riots were one of the most significant events in the history of Vancouver. 360 Riot Walk is an audio-visual experience that traces the history and route of the mob that attacked both the Chinese Canadian and …

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Kizuna 2020: Nikkei Kindness and Solidarity During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Japanese Canadian Art in the Time of Covid-19 - Part 7

Read Part 6 >>

These Covid times, emerging from our third lockdown in Ontario, as well as teaching online, has given me some pause to dwell upon our next generation of mentors/leaders as the times necessitate. In 2021, there has been a lot to celebrate nationally in the JC community with the news of artist, curator and activist Bryce Kanbara (Hamilton, ON) winning a Governor General's Visual Arts Award and fashion executive Sansei Susan Langdon (Toronto), whose parents were interned in New Denver, BC being appointed a member of the Order of Canada on December 31st, 2020, Canada's highest honour. …

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Chiru Sakura-Falling Cherry Blossoms: A Book Review

“My mother had, throughout it all, kept a diary as many of her generation were doing; thus minute details, often easily forgotten, about specific events and names appear in her memoir.”

—Vancouver Author Grace Eiko Thomson

In an intriguing way, Chiru Sakura-Falling Cherry Blossoms: A Mother & Daughter’s Journey Through Racism, Internment and Oppression is an important book for these Covid times when we have more moments of idleness, perhaps, to contemplate upon where we have come from, where we might be for the moment, and where we might possibly be heading when, as the title of Grace Eiko Thomson’s …

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The Wakayama Canada-Japan Friendship Totem Pole Project

Factoring in Japan with Canada has always been a juggling act. For generations it has been a “S/he loves me, s/he loves me not” relationship. Some find it necessary while others don’t: more than ever, identity is a complex selection of personal choices.

So, does being Japanese Canadian in 2021 even require a relationship with Japan, I wonder? Should we choose to include “Japanese”, then how do you define it for yourself? Are you simply gleefully (happy face emoji) Nikkei, or might there be something more substantial to that self identity?

Most recently, at least since the Sister City (Oakville, …

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