Canadian Nikkei Artist

Canadian Nikkei Artist series will focus on those in the Japanese Canadian community who are actively involved in the ongoing evolution: the artists, musicians, writers/poets and, broadly speaking, anybody else in the arts who grapples with their sense of identity. As such, the series will introduce Discover Nikkei readers to a wide range of ‘voices’, both established and emerging, that have something to say about their identity. This series aims to stir this cultural pot of Nikkeiness and, ultimately, build meaningful connections with Nikkei everywhere.

culture en

The Artistry of British Columbia’s Tsuneko Kokubo: Of Light Itself

“My true understanding of art began when I met Koko at the Vancouver School of Art so many years ago. By listening to what she had to say and watching her work, I learned that making art meant going beyond the obvious and searching for something more, and I’ve tried to stay on this path ever since. Amazingly, after all these years, her total dedication to dancing and to making beautiful art has remained undiminished, and has been an inspiration. Sharing work and staying connected is something I treasure.”

—Ottawa artist and friend Norman K. Takeuchi, whose Long Division show …

continue a ler

culture en

Ottawa artist Norman Takeuchi: Long Division Exhibition

“Ever since we both attended the Vancouver School of Art back in the 1950s, I have always respected Norman. He is a creative, seriously dedicated, focused, hard-working and disciplined artist. His work, with many references to two cultures, is constantly changing and growing. It is wonderful that we are both still painting and showing our work in our mid-80s…. We were so young!”

—Artist Tsuneko Kokubo (Silverton, BC) whose own Of Light Itself: RetroPERSPECTIVE is now showing at the Langham Gallery, Kaslo, BC

Sansei Ottawa artist Norman Kiyomitsu Takeuchi speaks about the complexities of being Japanese Canadian today through the …

continue a ler

culture en

A Nisei and Yonsei: The Power of Art & Isshoni - Part 2

Read Part 1 >>

Life After Internment in Edmonton

“At age 14, I had no ambitions but once I left the internment camp, I had the good fortune to live in the Misericordia Hospital, as did my sister. We were relief elevator operators for which the nuns provided us with room and board for working on weekends. We were enrolled into Garneau high school, which was across High Level Bridge, a 2 km walk or 10 minutes, by streetcar. Another classmate and I walked daily across the bridge except in winter when in a blizzard the temperature could reach 20 …

continue a ler

culture en

A Nisei and Yonsei: The Power of Art & Isshoni - Part 1

The paintings of Dr. Henry Shimizu, retired Edmonton Nisei plastic surgeon, were presented in a show at the University of Victoria’s (UVic) Legacy Gallery entitled Isshoni: Dr. Henry Shimizu’s Paintings of New Denver Internment that brought together Nisei Dr. Shimizu, curators Yonsei Samantha Kuniko Marsh (Vancouver, BC), and Sansei Bryce Kanbara (Hamilton, ON).

Well timed during this year, the 80th anniversary of the internment, one might wonder: How are we Japanese Canadians going to remember the internment and, importantly, how do the stories of internment resonate with younger generations? The theme of this exhibition presents a great launch pad for these …

continue a ler

culture en

Ottawa Artist Norman Takeuchi: Scrolling Exhibition

Even in the midst of a global pandemic, restrictions have not slowed down Ottawa Nisei artist Norman Takeuchi who recently launched his second exhibition in two years: Equal Time and this one entitled Scrolling.

Takeuchi’s father Nawoki was from Kochi and mother, Miyoko, was born in Vancouver. During World War Two the family stayed in the small Okanagan community of Westwold, BC along with some other Japanese Canadian families. After the war, they returned to Vancouver where his father reestablished his gardening business and mom set up a dress-making shop.

Born in Vancouver, Takeuchi, recalling his nascent interest in art, …

continue a ler

Tags

art artist British Columbia Bryce Kanbara Canada canada Canadian community COVID-19 culture exhibition Henry Shimizu internment Japan japanese canadian Long Division new denver Norman Takeuchi Of Light Itself Ottawa painting pandemic Powell Street Festival Samantha Kuniko Marsh Scrolling