Greg Robinson

Greg Robinson, nativo de Nueva York, es profesor de historia en la Universidad de Quebec en Montreal , una institución franco-parlante  de Montreal, Canadá. Él es autor de los libros By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans (Editorial de la Universidad de Harvard, 2001), A Tragedy of Democracy; Japanese Confinement in North America (Editorial de la Universidad de Columbia, 2009), After Camp: Portraits in Postwar Japanese Life and Politics (Editorial de la Universidad de California, 2012), y Pacific Citizens: Larry and Guyo Tajiri and Japanese American Journalism in the World War II Era (Editorial de la Universidad de Illinois, 2012), The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches (Editorial de la Universidad de Colorado, 2016), y coeditor de la antología Miné Okubo: Following Her Own Road (Editorial de la Universidad de Washington, 2008). Robinson es además coeditor del volumen de John Okada - The Life & Rediscovered Work of the Author of No-No Boy (Editorial del Universidad de Washington, 2018). El último libro de Robinson es una antología de sus columnas, The Unsung Great: Portraits of Extraordinary Japanese Americans (Editorial del Universidad de Washington, 2020). Puede ser contactado al email robinson.greg@uqam.ca.

Última actualización en julio de 2021

culture en

Kenji Toda: Groundbreaking Artist and Scholar

Not long ago I did a Discover Nikkei piece on the artist Bunji Tagawa, who made a career of scientific drawing for Scientific American, and who was lauded for the artistry of his technical work. I later discovered that Tagawa was preceded in the field by another prodigious Japanese artist-turned-scientific illustrator, Kenji Toda. Toda worked as staff artist in the Department of Zoology at the University of Chicago for 56 years, during which time he did thousands of drawings for zoology textbooks and biological works, and won international recognition for his work. His drawings ranged from endocrine glands …

lea más

culture en

A Family of Artists - Part 2: The Goodenow Brothers Make Their Own Marks

Read Part 1 >>

Although their father Kyohei Inukai achieved the greatest renown as an artist, the brothers Julian, Girard and Earle Goodenow sons took their family name and their chief support from their mother Lucene. After separating from Kyohei Inukai, Lucene moved with the three boys to Philadelphia, where she worked briefly as a magazine writer, then settled in Battle Creek, Michigan by 1921.

In 1925 she married Col. Lucien Taliaferro, a retired army officer, and settled in Connecticut. During the early 1930s, she moved to Hollywood and joined the California Arts Club. Although she did painting and design, …

lea más

culture en

A Family of Artists - Part 1: Kyohei Inukai, Society Portraitist

One remarkable clan of artists is that of the Inukai-Goodenow family. It was formed by Kyōhei Inukai, a Japanese immigrant who became a popular society portrait painter (and fencing enthusiast) in 1920s New York, and his first wife Lucene Goodenow, a writer, painter and sculptor. Their three sons, who were raised under their mother’s family name, would take up careers as artists and designers in midcentury America.

Much of what sketchy information is available about Kyōhei Inukai comes from his unfinished English-language memoir “Confessions of a Heathen”, which was rediscovered by collector Michiko Davey after his death and eventually published …

lea más

community en

Howard Thurman and Japanese Americans - Part 2

Read Part 1 >>

It was as co-pastor of the Fellowship Church that Howard Thurman made his greatest contribution to working with Japanese Americans. As mentioned previously, it was in 1944 that Thurman was invited to join a white minister, Alfred Fisk, as co-pastor of the new church, which was one of the first churches in the United States organized on an intentionally interracial and interreligious basis. The assignment was sufficiently noteworthy that, on his departure from Howard in May 1944, Thurman was fêted at a gala in which the guest speaker, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, wished him success in …

lea más

community en

Howard Thurman and Japanese Americans - Part 1

During the early 1940s, Howard Thurman, a noted orator and writer, was dean of chapel and professor of religion at Howard University, a historically Black university in Washington DC. He usually spent his summers on the road, traveling to conference centers, retreats, and churches.

Despite the wartime conditions, the summer of 1942 was no different. That July, his journeys took him as far west as California, where he attended a 10-day Race Relations institute at Whittier College. During that trip, he made it his business to visit an “Assembly Center” for Japanese-Americans, presumably at Santa Anita Park, the thoroughbred race …

lea más

Series en las que contribuye este autor