Greg Robinson

Greg Robinson, um nova-iorquino nativo, é professor de História na l'Université du Québec à Montréal, uma instituição de língua francesa em Montreal, no Canadá. Ele é autor dos livros By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans (Harvard University Press, 2001), A Tragedy of Democracy; Japanese Confinement in North America (Columbia University Press, 2009), After Camp: Portraits in Postwar Japanese Life and Politics (University of California Press, 2012) e Pacific Citizens: Larry and Guyo Tajiri and Japanese American Journalism in the World War II Era (University of Illinois Press, 2012), The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches (University Press of Colorado, 2016) e coeditor da antologia Miné Okubo: Following Her Own Road (University of Washington Press, 2008). Robinson também é co-editor de John Okada - The Life & Rediscovered Work of the Author of No-No Boy (University of Washington Press, 2018). Seu livro mais recente é uma antologia de suas colunas, The Unsung Great: Portraits of Extraordinary Japanese Americans (University of Washington Press, 2020). Ele pode ser contatado no e-mail robinson.greg@uqam.ca.

Atualizado em julho de 2021

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Bradford Smith: An American to Japan (and Back) — Part 2

Read Part 1 >> In February 1942, Bradford Smith was recruited by Alan Cranston, the future U.S. Senator, for a job with the Office of War Information (then called the Office of Facts and Figures). In April of that year, he left his teaching position at Bennington and moved to Washington, D.C. to take a position with OWI Foreign Language Division, headed by Cranston. In keeping with his own assumed expertise on Japan, Smith was assigned to head OWI’s “Japan desk.” There he worked to ensure the loyalty of immigrant and foreign-language groups. As is indicated by his …

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Bradford Smith: An American to Japan (and Back) — Part 1

Outside defenders of Japanese Americans during World War II, especially those in positions of power, were rare. Issei and Nisei did, however, receive various forms of assistance from a circle of “old Japan hands,” white Americans who had lived in Japan before the war and had become familiar with Japanese culture. These included such diverse figures as Protestant missionary Galen Fisher, Catholic priest Leopold Tibesar, naval agent Kenneth Ringle, diplomat William Castle, and (once he was freed from confinement in Japan) former U.S. Ambassador Joseph Grew. While they differed stro…

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The Strange Case of James Edmiston and ... James Edmiston — Part 2

Read Part 1 >> James Ewen Edmiston, Jr., who would take his father’s name at birth, and later on his closeness to Japanese Americans, was born in San Francisco, California on January 7, 1912. After moving to Oregon as a child with his family, he attended Medford High school, where he won the school tennis championship in 1929. He continued to play in tennis tournaments in the years that followed. In 1930 and 1931, he won the Central Oregon tennis tournament. Edmiston attended University of Oregon, where he majored in journalism. In the years after graduating, he married his wife …

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The Strange Case of James Edmiston and ... James Edmiston — Part 1

In recent years, I have done a good deal of research on James Edmiston. Through my reading, I discovered that James Edmiston was director of the WRA resettlement office in San José at the close of World War II, as Japanese Americans returned to the coast, and that his support for them led to attacks on him as well. I also read James Edmiston’s 1955 novel Home Again, a “documentary novel” about a Japanese American clan through immigration, settlement, and wartime confinement, and their return to the West Coast. Like many readers and commentators, I long assumed that…

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From Wilfred Hari to Yoshitaka Horiuchi: The career of an Expatriate Executive - Part 2

Read Part 1 >> The outbreak of the Pacific War would decisively shift the life of Wilfred Yoshitaka Horiuchi. Ironically, at first it aided his career, as Wilfred Hari was called back to work after Pearl Harbor for a walk-on part in a new war propaganda film, Secret Agent of Japan. When interviewed about the film by syndicated columnist Harrison Carroll in January 1942, Hari noted that he did not mind playing an evil Japanese, since he was a U.S. citizen. “I am married…but my wife urges me to go ahead. We are both Americans and want America to win the war.” Ha…

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