Discover Nikkei

https://www.discovernikkei.org/en/interviews/clips/1128/

Fusion Cuisine (Japanese)

(Japanese) What Peruvian cuisine and Japanese cuisine have in common is that they’ve both got many types of food that have evolved from 100 years or so of Chinese and Japanese people interacting with each other. In terms of Western cuisine, you don’t have stir-fried food. It’s been here forever. Finally now the wok and stir-fry are popular around the world, but here we’ve had a stir-fried dish called Lomo Saltado from long ago. Bottom line, this is Asian culture, right? And one more thing…the Peruvian people value the true taste of ingredients. Japanese people do too. In other words, we don’t eat meals where you just taste the sauce; we eat food where you can taste the ingredients. That’s exactly the same as Japanese cuisine.

So, when you get new ingredients, first you taste them and wonder, “Hmmm…This would probably go well with this kind of food…” That’s a real hands-on, local-focused approach. Cooking with cook books…that doesn’t give birth to fusion cuisine. You have to taste it yourself…try it out…that’s how fusion is conceived. So when people ask “How is fusion is created?”, trying it for yourself is the only way. That’s it. End of story. You just have to have good ingredients on hand.


cooking cuisine food fusion cuisine Peru

Date: April 18, 2007

Location: Lima, Peru

Interviewer: Ann Kaneko

Contributed by: Watase Media Arts Center, Japanese American National Museum

Interviewee Bio

Toshiro Konishi was born on July 11, 1953, the fourth son of a long-established Japanese restaurant owner in Saito City, Miyazaki Prefecture. Having played in the kitchen from around the age of six, at 11-years-old, Konishi began helping out in the kitchen with other chef candidates. Then in 1971, at age 16, he headed to Tokyo and became a chef at the restaurant “Fumi”.

In 1974, he moved to Peru with Nobuyuki Matsuhisa, known in America, Japan, and elsewhere for his Japanese fusion cuisine at his restaurant, “Nobu”. After working at the Japanese restaurant “Matsuei” for ten years, he opened “Toshiro’s” and “Wako” in a Sheraton hotel in Lima. In 2002, he also became manager of “Sushi Bar Toshiro’s” in the San Isidro region.

Aside from running the restaurants, he taught at San Ignacio de Loyola University, participated in culinary festivals around the world, introduced innovative cuisine known as “Peruvian Fusion” (a mix of Japanese and Peruvian cuisines), and received numerous awards. In 2008 he became the first Japanese chef based in Latin America to receive the Japanese government’s Minister's Prize from the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. (October 2009)

Peggie Nishimura Bain
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Peggie Nishimura Bain

Learning American cooking

(b.1909) Nisei from Washington. Incarcerated at Tule Lake and Minidoka during WWII. Resettled in Chicago after WWII

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Venancio Shinki
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Venancio Shinki

Help from fellow Japanese (Spanish)

(b. 1932-2016) Peruvian painter

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Wayne Shigeto Yokoyama
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Wayne Shigeto Yokoyama

Food growing up

(b.1948) Nikkei from Southern California living in Japan.

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Venancio Shinki
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Venancio Shinki

Education Japanese style (Spanish)

(b. 1932-2016) Peruvian painter

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Venancio Shinki
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Venancio Shinki

Closing the Japanese school and deportation (Spanish)

(b. 1932-2016) Peruvian painter

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Alfredo Kato
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Alfredo Kato

Japanese vs. Peruvian identity (Spanish)

(b. 1937) Professional journalist

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Alfredo Kato
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Alfredo Kato

Escaping to a small village in the mountains during the World War II (Spanish)

(b. 1937) Professional journalist

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Alfredo Kato
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Alfredo Kato

Post-war experiences in Lima (Spanish)

(b. 1937) Professional journalist

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Vince Ota
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Vince Ota

Little contact with Asians growing up on the east coast

Japanese American Creative designer living in Japan

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Margaret Oda
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Margaret Oda

Memories of family dinners

(1925 - 2018) Nisei educator from Hawai‘i

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Luis Yamada
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Luis Yamada

Suffering in World War II (Spanish)

(b. 1929) Nisei Argentinean

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Venancio Shinki
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Venancio Shinki

Hiding out to avoid the concentration camps (Spanish)

(b. 1932-2016) Peruvian painter

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Akira Watanabe
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Akira Watanabe

Origins of the Matsuri Daiko Group in Peru (Spanish)

(b. 1974) Director of Ryukyu Matsuri Daiko in Peru

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Akira Watanabe
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Akira Watanabe

The kimochi surpasses technique (Spanish)

(b. 1974) Director of Ryukyu Matsuri Daiko in Peru

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Peter Mizuki
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Peter Mizuki

Appreciation of Japanese food

Sansei Japanese American living in Japan and Kendo practioner

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