Chris Komai

Chris Komai é escritor freelancer e especialista em relações com a comunidade, atuando em Little Tokyo [área no centro de Los Angeles] há quatro décadas. Ele foi o Assessor de Comunicação do Museu Nacional Japonês Americano por mais de 21 anos, tendo sido responsável pela divulgação de eventos especiais, exposições e programas abertos ao público. Anteriormente, por 18 anos Komai trabalhou como escritor e editor esportista e editor de textos em inglês no jornal bilíngue (japonês e inglês) Rafu Shimpo. Além disso, ele é membro do Conselho da Comunidade de Little Tokyo e do comitê da Associação de Segurança Pública de Little Tokyo. Há 30 anos ele é membro do Comitê da União Nissei de Atletismo do Sul da Califórnia de basquete e beisebol. Ele recebeu o título de Bacharel em Inglês na Universidade da Califórnia em Riverside.

Atualizado em abril de 2014

media en

Guilty Pleasures

As with most people who subscribe to cable television, I suffer through an endless number of inconveniences, indignities, and monetary insults. When the signal becomes sporadic or even fails, I call and get a recording that tells me to unplug my box and let it reboot, which seems like the kind of tech support that my long-deceased Issei grandparents could have figured out. (My grandmother, for instance, referred to their automobile, in her halting English, as “the machine.”) Cable gets more expensive every year, but they compensate by making the customer service worse and worse. B…

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Ishikawa's Moment

In a previous article, I highlighted the fact that the Dodgers and the Giants had three Japanese Americans on their rosters (Darwin Barney and Brandon League for the Dodgers, Travis Ishikawa for the Giants) and how, to my knowledge, this had never happened before. I also pointed out that Ishikawa had a singular moment in Giants’ play-off history by drawing a walk that spurred a rally against the Atlanta Braves in the 2010. But while a walk is an important component of baseball offenses, it does not evoke the pure emotion for fans like a key hit that wins a game. Wouldn’t it be nic…

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Japanese American Major Leaguers

Sitting in the upper deck overlooking right field at AT&T Park in San Francisco for the first game of the Dodgers-Giants series in September, I was feeling pretty low. As part of the biennial Komai Family Reunion this year, our Northern California relatives had arranged to get tickets to this historic rivalry and even chartered a bus for us to attend the game as a group. Not surprisingly, most of the Northern relatives wore Giants’ gear. A few of us from the south, like my brother and his wife, were audacious enough to wear Dodger Blue. Which is how we Dodger fans were feeling near …

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Don't Forget Pat Suzuki

Do you know who Pat Suzuki is, and why she is significant to Japanese Americans? I suspect you would have to be at least as old as me (a Sansei born in the early 1950s) to recognize her name and know that she was a popular singer. Any Nisei would know instantly who she was and why she was important. In fact, my sense of Pat Suzuki is based almost entirely on the feeling I got from my aunt when I was growing up. For the record, Chiyoko “Pat” Suzuki was, indeed, a singer who recorded four albums for RCA Victor; starred in the Rodgers and Hammerstein original Broadway musical, Flo…

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community en

Nisei Week 80th Anniversary

Eighty years ago, the inaugural Nisei Week was organized in Little Tokyo in 1934. A distinctive Nikkei community event that was actually created as a marketing campaign, Nisei Week reflects the bicultural character of its founders. It has a parade that features ondo dancers (which explains why the parade with such a physically short route takes the hours to complete). It has a queen pageant where contestants wear kimono. Like its founders, Nisei Week’s resiliency is notable, having survived the World War II forced removal (including the abandonment of Little Tokyo) and changing tastes a…

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