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The identity crisis of Peruvian children in Japan (Spanish)

(Spanish) Children who were born, raised and educated here, they think they are ... Well, not all, right? They think that they are Japanese. As they are children, they still do not know what the law of citizenship is; then they think they are Japanese, right? So now there are many parents who, for the children, are being nationalized. For as much as they are capable and as professional as they are, many times, if one does not have Japanese citizenship, they are not welcomed. To maintain the language, it is up to each family, I believe. There are many families who put a rule in place in their home. At home, Spanish. One step outside, all Japanese. Generally what helps in this time of crisis is ... some, or many, have had to make a decision; for those who cannot survive here in Japan, they have had to return to Peru. Then the child can continue with his/her studies. No, I think there is also an institution that supports them, right? To balance out. So that is the advantage of [UI]. I do not think that there is discontinuity because here the Peruvian culture, the Incan culture is very well received by the Japanese. The Peruvians are always doing activities of their culture, right? So I think that the children who were born and raised here, there are many children that preserve our Peruvian culture.


identity Nikkei in Japan

Date: March 24, 2009

Location: Tokyo, Japan

Interviewer: Alberto Matsumoto

Contributed by: Watase Media Arts Center, Japanese American National Museum

Interviewee Bio

Born in Peru. Starting in 1980, she managed ELECTRONICA MORUMBI S.R.L., a company specializing in building and repairing electronics, for about ten years. After moving to Japan in September of 1990, she first registered as a volunteer of the Globalization Committee of Yamato city. Later, she remained active as an interpreter and consultant, and also stayed engaged with the AMDA (American Medical Directors Association) Medical Information Center.

From 2001, she worked as an interpreter and consultant for South American Nikkei workers at the Industrial Employment Stabilization Center’s Kanagawa location, and from 2002 to 2005, she worked for TOKIO NIKKEIS (Ueno/Shinjuku area employment stabilization center), a firm operated by the same agency. In addition, she served as a translator for the Administrative Procedures Office’s Futaba branch, for the businesses in the community, and currently for the “Training of Nikkei For Employment Preparation”—a project commissioned by the Overseas Nikkei Association.

In Yamato city, she is a local radio host on FM YAMATO, and she is also a member of the city sponsored “Multicultural Coexistence Convention” and the “Regional Welfare Planning and Implementation Committee”. (July 2010)

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Hiroshi Sakane

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Hiroshi Sakane
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(b. 1979) Sansei Nikkei Brazilian who lives in Oizumi-machi in Gunma prefecture. He runs his own design studio.

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(b. 1979) Sansei Nikkei Brazilian who lives in Oizumi-machi in Gunma prefecture. He runs his own design studio.

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(b. 1979) Sansei Nikkei Brazilian who lives in Oizumi-machi in Gunma prefecture. He runs his own design studio.

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Juan Alberto Matsumoto
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Juan Alberto Matsumoto

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(b. 1962) Nisei Japanese Argentinian, currently residing in Japan

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Juan Alberto Matsumoto
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Juan Alberto Matsumoto

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(b. 1962) Nisei Japanese Argentinian, currently residing in Japan

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Juan Alberto Matsumoto
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Juan Alberto Matsumoto

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(b. 1962) Nisei Japanese Argentinian, currently residing in Japan

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Juan Alberto Matsumoto
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Juan Alberto Matsumoto

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