Tamiko Nimura

Tamiko Nimura é uma escritora sansei/pinay [filipina-americana]. Originalmente do norte da Califórnia, ela atualmente reside na costa noroeste dos Estados Unidos. Seus artigos já foram ou serão publicados no San Francisco ChronicleKartika ReviewThe Seattle Star, Seattlest.com, International Examiner  (Seattle) e no Rafu Shimpo. Além disso, ela escreve para o seu blog Kikugirl.net, e está trabalhando em um projeto literário sobre um manuscrito não publicado de seu pai, o qual descreve seu encarceramento no campo de internamento de Tule Lake [na Califórnia] durante a Segunda Guerra Mundial.

Atualizado em junho de 2012

food en

Eggplant Zucchini Okazu (Okazu Nimura-Style)

When Josh and I were in college and just learning how to live together, we also had to figure out how to cook together. It didn’t take long to find our go-to multicultural meal plan: chicken, vegetables, rice (Asian nights!). Or, chicken, vegetables, pasta (Italian nights!). We had lots of variations: stir-fry chicken teriyaki chicken, BBQ chicken, chicken cacciatore. For vegetables: salad, steamed broccoli. For carbohydrates: rice or pasta.

Every once in a while, we’d break out of the routine and splurge on some ground beef, and we’d make okazu.

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In Japan, okazu is just a name for …

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identity en

The Retelling: Talking To The National Parks Service About Tule Lake

QUESTION 1: WHAT DO YOU VALUE MOST ABOUT THE TULE LAKE UNIT? 

Struggle. Struggle. I obeyed essay questions all the way through my multiple degrees in English. I want to answer the question well. I want to be a good student.

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Begin by quoting the prompt.

The Tule Lake Unit is where my family was incarcerated during World War II: where my father, his siblings, my grandparents, lived for several years. I value the Unit because it formed a significant part of my family’s life experiences, and in turn it formed mine.

I want you to think about what …

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identity en ja es pt

Nikkei Chronicles #2—Nikkei+: Stories of Mixed Language, Traditions, Generations & Race

Retratos de um Álbum de uma Nikkei/Filipina

“A sua mãe é filipina?” a mãe de uma amiga me perguntou. Ela também é filipina. Ela sacode a cabeça e sorri, mas não de modo antipático. “Você parece mais japonesa”.

* * * * *

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Tanto o meu primeiro nome quanto o meu sobrenome são japoneses. Nenhum dos meus nomes são de uma filipina. Mas aí tem a cor da minha pele, que na costa noroeste do Pacífico [nos E.U.A.] é chamada de “um bom bronzeado”. Eu sei preparar turón, lumpia e adobo. Eu sei fazer uma galinha teriyaki “completa”, usando uma receita de família …

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war en

Speaking Up! Democracy, Justice, Dignity

Of No-No Boy and No-No Boys: At the Seattle 2013 JANM Conference

“How do you as a storyteller account for traces of the erased, the denied or that flat out vanished?”—Junot Díaz

From Twitter: 
July 15, 2013, 12:35PM: @Tulelakenps: Today, 70 years ago in 1943, Tule Lake was declared a Segregation Center, incarcerating all Japanese Americans deemed “disloyal”.

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“Your name?”

I’m picking up my registration packet for the Japanese American National Museum conference, held in Seattle a few weeks ago. “Nimura, N-I-M…” I begin, and start to spell out my last name for the volunteer automatically, but then I stop. She’s already flipping through the packets and tote bags. She hands …

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identity en

For a Sister Getting Married: Senbazuru—1000 Cranes

“What are those?”

I’m staying overnight with my daughter and her friends on a field trip. My daughter’s best friend is looking at the ziploc bag of paper, sitting on the hotel bedside table.

“They’re origami cranes. You remember the story of Sadako that you read in your class this year? If you fold a thousand, you get a wish?”

“Yeah. Can I look at one?” When I nod she takes one out of the bag, carefully. “They’re cool.”

“I’m trying to fold a thousand for my sister’s wedding. It’s a Japanese American tradition. Cranes are supposed to live a …

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