Tamiko Nimura

Tamiko Nimura é uma escritora sansei/pinay [filipina-americana]. Originalmente do norte da Califórnia, ela atualmente reside na costa noroeste dos Estados Unidos. Seus artigos já foram ou serão publicados no San Francisco ChronicleKartika ReviewThe Seattle Star, Seattlest.com, International Examiner  (Seattle) e no Rafu Shimpo. Além disso, ela escreve para o seu blog Kikugirl.net, e está trabalhando em um projeto literário sobre um manuscrito não publicado de seu pai, o qual descreve seu encarceramento no campo de internamento de Tule Lake [na Califórnia] durante a Segunda Guerra Mundial.

Atualizado em junho de 2012

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Camp Memorials, Silence, and Restlessness: A Dialogue with Brandon Shimoda - Part 1

2017 has been a Year of Remembrance in the Japanese American community, commemorating 75 years since the signing of Executive Order 9066. Many Days of Remembrance events have been planned around the country, with more events to come. It’s a year that has made me wonder about the long-term effects of memorials and memory. For whom are memorials important? When are they useful? When are they unsatisfying? I reached out to the Sansei/Yonsei writer Brandon Shimoda, who I’ve known from Twitter, to have a conversation about these issues, and more. Brandon is the author of several boo…

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Following the Path, Listening to Footsteps: A Day of Remembrance for Tacoma

I am thinking about paths, footsteps, gravel, listening, memory. When I visited the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial wall a few years ago, I was fascinated by the architectural design details that I heard—all lovingly told by Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community president Clarence Moriwaki. The memorial is strategically placed next to the very same path where the first Japanese Americans walked on their way to the ferry terminal for their wartime forcible removal. The memorial wall winds next to a gravel path. The gravel, Clarence said, was placed there …

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An Inclusive Legacy of Peace: The Nikkei History of Jean's House of Prayer

Next to a Philly cheesesteak drive-up booth in downtown Tacoma, there’s a wood-frame two-story house, surrounded by vacant lots on either side, facing a desolate parking lot. From the street, even despite the presence of the “peace pole” in the front yard, 1414 Tacoma Avenue doesn’t look like very much. But as luck would have it, I approached “Jean’s House of Prayer” from the back—from the left backyard, in fact—and so I saw Jean right away. A life-size mural of Jean stands permanently next to the back door of the house. She’s wea…

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What Remains: A Tour of Tacoma's Japantown

“Well, if we get about ten or fifteen people,” said my colleague Michael Sullivan, “that’ll be a good group. And it’s supposed to rain, so who knows who will show up?” For a few years, Michael and I had been working on telling bits and pieces of Japanese American history separately (including blog posts, personal essays, an encyclopedia article) and together, on a joint project about the history of the Lorenz Building near the center of downtown Tacoma. But we’d been invited to conduct a walking tour together. Armed with an iPad presentation and hist…

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The Story of One Tacoma Issei, Shuichi Fukui: Journalist, Historian, WWI Veteran

As I’m writing this essay, I have moved between the despair I mentioned last month and the hope that I have for the future. My daughters went to their first protest march; my oldest daughter made her first call to a senator without being prompted or asked. Living in Washington State, as we do, it’s hard not to feel despair, as I did this morning when I read that a newspaper in Kennewick, Washington published an editorial defending the logic of WWII Japanese American incarceration. And it’s hard not to feel hope when our governor, Jay Inslee, invoked this same history of Jap…

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