Jonathan van Harmelen

Jonathan van Harmelen estudia actualmente un doctorado (Ph.D) en historia en la Universidad de California en Santa Cruz, con especialización en la historia del encarcelamiento japonés-americano. Es licenciado en historia e idioma francés por la Universidad Pomona y ha completado una maestría en humanidades en la Universidad de Georgetown. Entre el 2015 y el 2018, Jonathan había trabajado para el Museo Nacional de Historia Americana como pasante e investigador. Puede ser contactado al email jvanharm@ucsc.edu.

Última actualización en febrero de 2020

culture en

A Heart to Heart: Carlos Bulosan and Japanese Americans - Part 2

Read Part 1>> In our previous section, we discussed Carlos Bulosan’s biography and his rise to success as an Asian American writer during the war years. While Bulsan wrote as a representative of Philippine Americans and centered his discussion on the experience of Pinoy workers, he showed a deep interest in other Asian American groups, particularly Japanese Americans. At a time when tensions were high between Filipino and Japanese Americans due to the Pacific War, Bulosan expressed feelings of friendship, empathy and admiration for the Nisei. In return, several Japanese Amer...

lea más

culture en

A Heart to Heart: Carlos Bulosan and Japanese Americans - Part 1

One of the first and most gifted writers to express an Asian American consciousness was Carlos Bulosan. Bulosan’s experience as a migrant laborer from the Philippines to the U.S. and his travels along the California coast during the era of the Great Depression inspired his work, most notably his autobiographical novel America is in the Heart (1946). The novel introduced the experience of Filipino migrants to American audiences. Bulosan’s incisive portraits of migrant farmworkers provided one of the first accounts for a mainstream audience of the prejudice and hardships that Fi...

lea más

media en

Kamisama of the Club — Jazz Player James Araki and Bebop in Japan

If there was a sound that defined United States history, it would be jazz. As Amiri Baraka stated in his landmark book Blues People, jazz’s history is intertwined with the black experience from enslavement, emancipation, segregation, and eventually on to migration to cities. Rooted in the Blues and the African American gospel, and drawing from European classical music and other musical traditions, jazz emerged at the beginning of the 20th century as a cornerstone of American identity at home and abroad. Within this larger history is the story of the Asian American musicians and fans ...

lea más

war en

A Day at the Racetrack: Kenneth Rexroth’s Support for Japanese Americans During World War II

Kenneth Rexroth (1905-1982) is, in many ways, California’s poet. Although born in Indiana and having spent most of his young adult years in Chicago, Rexroth left for California at age 22, and spent the remainder of his life there. During those subsequent fifty-five years, Rexroth embarked on an ambitious career as a poet, painter, and political activist, living the first half of his California years in San Francisco and his later years in Santa Barbara, where he was a professor of English at University of California, Santa Barbara.  As poet Donald Hall described Rexroth in a 1...

lea más

community en

Teiko Ishida – A Woman of Conviction in the JACL — Part 2

Read Part 1 >> In September 1943, the Japanese American Citizens League announced that Mike Masaoka, George Inagaki, JACL membership director, and Joe Kanazawa, the JACL’s Eastern Representative, had enlisted in the U.S. Army and left their JACL positions. The JACL then selected Ishida as acting National Secretary for the east, and sent her to open a new office at 299 Madison Ave. in New York City. (For a time Ishida, along with the Tajiris, was the JACL’s only paid employee). During her tenure as acting national secretary, Ishida undertook several further initiatives ...

lea más