Jonathan van Harmelen

Jonathan van Harmelen estudia actualmente un doctorado (Ph.D) en historia en la Universidad de California en Santa Cruz, con especialización en la historia del encarcelamiento japonés-americano. Es licenciado en historia e idioma francés por la Universidad Pomona y ha completado una maestría en humanidades en la Universidad de Georgetown. Entre el 2015 y el 2018, Jonathan había trabajado para el Museo Nacional de Historia Americana como pasante e investigador. Puede ser contactado al email jvanharm@ucsc.edu.

Última actualización en febrero de 2020

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The Curious Case of Ronald Lane Latimer: A Born-Again Buddhist - Part 2

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For the most part, existing biographies of Ronald Lane Latimer’s life concentrate on Latimer’s publishing work and his relationship to Modernist poets like Stevens. Less is known of Latimer’s wartime activities and his postwar life. While Reverend Latimer’s defense of Buddhism in his statement before Tolan Committee has been recorded by various scholars, the story of his activism among Japanese Americans during the incarceration process remains much less known. 

From April until late July 1942, Latimer, along with fellow Buddhist priest Reverend Julius Goldwater, made weekly trips on Sundays to the Santa Anita detention center to …

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The Curious Case of Ronald Lane Latimer: A Born-Again Buddhist - Part 1

Numerous authors have previously uncovered the stories of the outside supporters who vocalized their support for Japanese American communities amidst the wave of anti-Japanese vitriol on the West Coast in early 1942. Although the community of supporters ranged from leftist activists to New Deal idealists, it was a small minority of religious figures who agreed on the moral repugnance of Executive Order 9066 and mobilized to assist Japanese Americans during the ensuing incarceration.

One of the most unique personalities among those individuals who spoke out on behalf of Japanese Americans is Ronald Lane Latimer, a Buddhist priest. Latimer lived several …

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The French Connection: What Newspapers in Wartime France Said About Japanese Americans

The story of the wartime incarceration of Japanese Americans is not only a part of U.S. history, but also a part of global history. As many Issei remained in touch with families in Japan, news of the wartime incarceration travelled across the Pacific, and even became a propaganda tool in Japan. As I note in my previous article on Dutch articles on the incarceration, many European newspapers outlets across the Atlantic also showed interest in the story of the wartime incarceration. Like the Netherlands, numerous French journalist and writers published articles on the incarceration of Japanese Americans. However, even …

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Father Thomas Takahashi – A Man of One Spirit in Two Worlds

Although most of the permanent clergy at the Maryknoll missions did not come out of the Japanese American community, a number of Nikkei clergy, such as Sisters Bernadette and Suzanne, worked among the Japanese American community. One of the first Japanese American Catholics to enter the priesthood was Father Thomas Wataru Takahashi, known also by his friends as “Watson” Takahashi, who built a successful career as a Maryknoll missionary in Los Angeles and in Japan. 

Thomas Wataru Takahashi was born on August 3, 1919 in Los Angeles, the son of Japanese immigrants Paul Kanai and Hisayo Takahashi. During his childhood, …

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Toge Fujihira: Master Photographer and World Traveler - Part 2

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Even as Fujihira and Shilin made their documentaries on Native Americans, they also collaborated on a series of films for the Protestant Film Commission. In 1951, Fujihira travelled to Brazil to shoot a film on Church missionary work there. The following year, they released An End to Darkness, a nondenominational film about a Liberian boy’s struggle for a Christian education and his desire to return home and serve his people. 

Similarly, Challenge in the Sun (1952) depicted a young missionary couple representing the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Missionary District of the Panama Canal Zone, …

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