Tamiko Nimura

Tamiko Nimura es una escritora sansei/pinay, originaria del norte de California y que actualmente vive en el Noroeste del Pacífico. Sus escritos han aparecido o aparecerán en The San Francisco Chronicle, Kartika Review, The Seattle Star, Seattlest.com, The International Examiner (Seattle), y el Rafu Shimpo. Ella bloguea en Kikugirl.net, y está trabajando en un proyecto de libro que corresponde al manuscrito no publicado de su padre sobre su encarcelamiento en el campo Tule Lake durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial.

Última actualización en Julio de 2012

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Inspirar para el futuro: Héroes nikkei menores de 30

“A Deep Collective Feeling”: Emily Akpan, Black-Nikkei Activist Hero

Emily Akpan is a Black-Nikkei activist living in Brooklyn, New York. She has been active in many social justice struggles, including Tsuru for Solidarity and New York Day of Remembrance. In March 2022, she was kind enough to take time to answer some questions for Discover Nikkei’s Inspire Forward: Nikkei Heroes Under 30 series. Her story is inspiring and provides insights and help for aspiring activists. * * * * * Tamiko Nimura (TN): Congratulations on being selected as a “Nikkei hero”! How do you feel about being selected? Emily Akpan (EA): Thank you so much! I fe...

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Reframing Japanese American Bitterness: A Partial Chronology

It is February 2022, and the 80th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066 has just passed with a groundswell of events commemorating a National Japanese American Day of Remembrance. I am grateful to have participated in a few, and proud of the Japanese American community for all of its efforts to keep camp history alive. I live in the wake of remembrance and resistance and resilience, and I am grateful for all of these. As a Sansei daughter, niece, granddaughter of Japanese American incarcerees, I have been thinking very hard about some lines from my Nisei dad’s unpublishe...

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Tracing the Past With The Present: Yonsei Artist Lauren Iida

Yonsei artist Lauren Iida and I first met online years ago when I interviewed her from Cambodia. Since that conversation her arts practice has expanded and deepened, as has her entrepreneurship and mentorship—all of these factors making her career an exciting one to watch. Her beautifully evocative paper cutting artworks include Memory Net, the series 100 Aspects of the Moon, and the series 32 Aspects of Daily Life. Many of them draw on her Japanese American heritage and historical research, and are often inspired by old family photographs.  In recent years Iida’s wor...

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“War Did Not Break This Family”: Nancy Kyoko Oda and the Tule Lake Stockade Diary

In 2014, I was training to be a discussion leader for the intergenerational dialogues that are an integral part of the Tule Lake pilgrimage. In the training session with 20+ participants, we were given three minutes to introduce ourselves to each other, in pairs. I was sitting next to a Sansei woman with kind brown eyes and a warm smile. As my partner introduced herself, I started nodding with excitement—we were supposed to listen, not speak, for those three minutes. But I could hardly wait to speak, because we shared so much in common. Both of us have artistic sisters; both of us had...

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El Poder de Nuestras Historias

On Topaz Stories and “Authentic Voice”: A Conversation With Writer And Editor Ruth Sasaki - Part 2

Read Part 1 >> Tamiko Nimura: As editor/curator, are there any particular segments in Topaz Stories that resonate for you? Ruth Sasaki: There are stories that are a miracle for the recall of specific details by someone who was a young child in camp, like Jon Yatabe’s “Toy Story.” Another story, “Father and Son” by Dan Hirano, who was actually born in Topaz, grabbed me for its distinctive voice and the image that came to mind as I read it of someone in his 70s (decades later) poring over a cherished and worn photo—of himself sitting on his father...

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