Stuff contributed by CharlesHachiro

You Are Canadian Nisei If . . . Part II

Chuck Tasaka

Discover Nikkei published my article titled, You Are Canadian Nisei If . . . on December 9, 2015. There were more Nisei traits uncovered to add to this article. I wonder if there are any more hidden gems regarding Canadian Nisei identity?

Nisei: Sports Brought “Wa” (Harmony)

Chuck Tasaka

The famous Vancouver Asahi baseball teams have been well-documented and the latest, a movie made in Japan called Asahi was the “icing on the cake”. Pat Adachi was the first to write the history of the Asahi franchise in her book titled Asahi: A Legend in Baseball. Jari Osborne followed …

Nisei: Summer Jobs

Chuck Tasaka

“What? I have to travel 400 km to work all summer? I will call family services!” No, no, that didn’t come out of the mouth of a Nisei. They followed their parents’ orders. The Child’s Labour Code was not discussed back in those days. Parents just said, “Mo, ichi-nin mae …

Nisei Saves! Mottainai

Chuck Tasaka


Nisei: Internment Camp Life

Chuck Tasaka

Greenwood was the first “internment centre” and Tashme was the last. In-between, there were Lemon Creek, Popoff, Bay Farm, New Denver, Rosebery, Sandon, and Kaslo. Self-supporting camps were East Lillooet, Minto Mine, Bridge River, and McGillivray Falls. Other self-supporting camps like Taylor Lake, Tappen, Blind Bay, Christina Lake, and Grand …

Nikkei Chronicles #5—Nikkei-go: The Language of Family, Community, and Culture

You-mo? Me mo!: Nisei Language and Dialect

Chuck Tasaka

I don’t have a PhD in linguistics but I hope that a budding linguist major will get interested in this topic. In Hawaii, the first boat load of about 150 Japanese immigrants came to this island as sugar cane laborers in 1868. It was called Gannen-mono, first-year people. However, it …

Love, Nisei Style

Chuck Tasaka

Dion and the Belmonts made the doo wop song famous with “Teenagers in Love.” We could call this segment “Nisei-gers in Love.” Was this the clash of the old world Issei tradition versus the new world Canadian way?

The Nisei Hepcats

Chuck Tasaka

“The day the music died,” from the song “American Pie” by Don McLean, referred to February 3, 1959, the day Buddy Holly, Richie Valens, and the Big Bopper perished in the ill-fated plane crash in Clear Lake, Iowa. Those who were teenagers back then remembered ever so clearly when they …

Cumberland Chow Mein, Denbazuke, Karinto? It's Canadian Nisei Food!

Chuck Tasaka

How can you tell a Nisei by looking at the food they eat? Have you heard of Cumberland chow mein, denbazuke, or karinto? In the case of Japanese Hawaiians, you have heard of and most likely have eaten Spam sushi. Spam sushi became popular after World War II when the …

Greenwood, B.C.: First Internment Center

Chuck Tasaka

Greenwood, British Columbia, in Canada became the first internment center when Nikkei people were uprooted and “relocated” from the coast of B.C. On December 7, 1941, Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, and shortly after Canada declared war on Japan when Hong Kong, a British Commonwealth, fell to the Japanese army. This …

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About

A graduate of U.B.C. and retired teacher since 2002. Coached various sports for 41 years, but in 2010, I wanted to devote more time to the Nikkei history. I wrote two books, "Hanatare Bozu" and " Family History of Greenwood-Midway.

Nikkei interests

  • community history
  • family stories
  • Japanese/Nikkei food

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