Stuff contributed by CharlesHachiro

Nisei: When The Nisei-nts Go Marching In ...

Chuck Tasaka

When the saints go marching in, oh when the saints go marching in…. oh when the Nisei-nts go marching in…… There was Christian influence in Japan when missionaries had travelled there in the 1800s. Even before that Jesuit priests from Portugal were present. Tokugawa government tried to put a stop …

75th Anniversary of the Japanese Canadian Internment

Chuck Tasaka

What was to be a simple, casual get-together to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Japanese Canadian Internment, a Nikkei “Woodstock-like Love-in” occurred at St. Joseph the Worker School in Richmond on April 29th!

Nisei: Immigration To Canada

Chuck Tasaka

Manzo Nagano is credited for being the first Japanese settler in Canada in 1877, though he was not the first to come to B.C. Japanese sailors were rescued from a shipwrecked whaling boat as early as 1834. In Ann-Lee and Gordon Switzer’s books Gateway to Promise and Sakura in Stone, …

Nisei: Nikkei Connection to McLean Mill

Chuck Tasaka

Did you know that there was a very small settlement of Japanese Canadians at the McLean Mill in Port Alberni on Vancouver Island in the early thirties?

Nisei: Yancha Kozo For All Seasons - Part 4

Chuck Tasaka

Read Part 3 >>

Nisei: Yancha Kozo For All Seasons - Part 3

Chuck Tasaka

Read Part 2 >>

Nisei: Yancha Kozo For All Seasons - Part 2

Chuck Tasaka

Read Part 1 >>

Nisei: Yancha Kozo For All Seasons - Part 1

Chuck Tasaka

Post-war babies born in the internment camps should be considered the ‘Lucky Ones’? These children didn’t suffer the whole forced removal ordeal beginning in 1942. They were born in Greenwood, New Denver, Kaslo, Slocan City or Lillooet where there were hospitals. There were several Nisei doctors serving in those areas.

Mio-Steveston Fishermen Dialect

Chuck Tasaka

Whenever you hear of Mio, a poor, small fishing village south-east of Osaka in Wakayama-ken, the name ‘Amerika Mura’ comes to mind. To the villagers, Amerika was Canada and U.S. Gihei Kuno’s name became synonymous with Mio-Steveston connection. He was a master carpenter who was trying to raise fund to …

Nisei: The Games We Played

Chuck Tasaka

Nisei growing up on Powell Streets in the ’30s didn’t have that many toys so they had to improvise. Some boys picked chestnuts off the ground and pierced them with a needle with string threaded through to the other side and made bolos. The girls played hopscotch and skipping. Traditional …

Login or Register to join our Nima-kai

About

A graduate of U.B.C. and retired teacher since 2002. Coached various sports for 41 years, but in 2010, I wanted to devote more time to the Nikkei history. I wrote two books, "Hanatare Bozu" and " Family History of Greenwood-Midway.

Nikkei interests

  • community history
  • family stories
  • Japanese/Nikkei food

Get updates

Sign up for email updates

Journal feed
Events feed
Comments feed

Support this project

Discover Nikkei

Discover Nikkei is a place to connect with others and share the Nikkei experience. To continue to sustain and grow this project, we need your help!

Ways to help >>

A project of the Japanese American National Museum


Major support by The Nippon Foundation