Tuney-Tosheia P. McDaniels

Tuney-Tosheia P. McDaniels is an Economic Anthropologist, Childhood Anthropologist, and English Instructor living in Japan, observing the role of humanity from an Economic perspective. She analyzes how both children and adults use Projection of Magical Thinking, Fear, and Risk to respond to Economic uncertainties and opportunities.

Updated May 2021

community en

Kizuna 2020: Nikkei Kindness and Solidarity During the COVID-19 Pandemic

How UNICEF Information Helps Us Observe Nikkei Children Living Through a Pandemic and Economic Crisis

While I was observing and communicating with Japanese UNICEF Advocates on the street, some questions came to my mind:

—Do the current pandemic and economic challenges affect the Nikkei communities in different countries the same way? How do the Nikkei communities in different countries perceive economic challenges, racism, prejudice, and even vaccinations?

—For example, do Japanese Peruvians, Japanese Columbians, or Japanese Mexicans face more challenges than Japanese Americans, Japanese Canadians, Japanese Brazilians, or the Japanese in Europe? Or all groups treated the same now, due to the current pandemic?

—Do Nikkei who have privilege take for granted how the pandemic …

Read more

community en

Nikkei and Praying for Good Fortune and Success: How an Ancient Story Teaches resilience for Economic Uncertainty and Opportunity

As is customary in Japan and throughout the Japanese diaspora, many Nikkei Entrepreneurs pray for good fortune in business, success in life, and divine protection. From an Economic Anthropological perspective, praying allows entrepreneurs and business professionals to strengthen themselves from the worries surrounding economic instability, and even tune out the negativity they constantly hear on the news. While the traditional custom of Hatsumode (初詣), or the first shrine or temple visit of the new year, is to pray at the altar for Protection and Prosperity, a special festival—known as the Touka Ebisu Matsuri (十日えびすの 祭り)—is held for business owners who …

Read more

community en

Kizuna 2020: Nikkei Kindness and Solidarity During the COVID-19 Pandemic

A Different Perspective: A Nikkeijin's Questions on Humanity's Responses to Economic Uncertainty

Is ignorance really bliss? What does it mean when people say, “I can’t wait for things to go back to normal”? What is defined as “normal”? Is “going back to normal” achievable after over 2.6 million deaths worldwide due to the Coronavirus—with over 530,000 Coronavirus-related deaths in the US alone? Also, what does it mean to be Economically stable at this point in time?

In this article, I want to reflect from an Economic Anthropological perspective. This means I intend to focus on the issues of humanity neither based on rational decision-making nor based on actual scarcity of economic resources. …

Read more