Discover Nikkei

https://www.discovernikkei.org/en/interviews/clips/857/

Origins of the Matsuri Daiko Group in Peru (Spanish)

(Spanish) With the passage of time and because of the centennial celebrations [marking] Japanese immigration to Peru in 1999, [and] as a result of an invitation to the youth, a performance was done, with more than 400 people, where the eisa was danced, and other dance styles pertaining to the Matsuri Daiko, and it was such that people came from the head office to see it and they invited us and they asked us if we wanted to form a branch office here in Peru, which we accepted with so much enthusiasm. The initial group that formed for the centenary celebration…this started as an initiative of the Okinawense Association of Peru, where they planned to perform an eisa dance during the festivities where there were lots of people gathered. In truth, they were the ones who suffered [because they worked hard to pull it off]. They were the ones who organized the meeting; first they began to publicize by word of mouth to the people they knew. Afterwards, perhaps, using the media of the collectivity, and therefore eventually more and more people joined. In the beginning there were about 100 people, and with these 100 people, when we reached this goal, they said we could [increase membership even more], we can be 200, 300, and at the end we had 420 persons. All this happened in April 1999. Afterwards, as we had the invitation, and then a few months to think [about] how we were going to move the group forward, what were we going to do, of what manner we were going to organize, where we were going to rehearse, especially since the centenary had ended. It was [on] September 24, 1999, [that we] officially constituted a group and from that moment our story began.


culture dance Japan Matsuri Daiko Okinawa Prefecture Peru

Date: September 14, 2007

Location: Lima, Peru

Interviewer: Harumi Nako

Contributed by: Asociación Peruano Japonesa (APJ)

Interviewee Bio

Akira Watanabe Osada was born on October 6, 1974, in Lima, Peru. His grandparents are Japanese immigrants who came to Peru from Fukushima Ken. An engineer, Akira is also director of the Peru branch of the Ryukyukoku Matsuri Daiko Group. Founded in 1999, the branch grew out of the festivities commemorating Japanese immigration to Peru. Akira promotes the Okinawa eisa dance throughout the country. As a member of this group, Akira has performed quite often in Peru, which the most important of these performances have been the centennial celebrations marking Japanese immigration to Peru (1999), and the Centenary of Okinawense Immigration to Peru (2006). (September 14, 2007)

Jero (Jerome Charles White Jr.)
en
ja
es
pt
Jero (Jerome Charles White Jr.)

Hopes everyone pursues their dreams regardless of race or heritage

(b. 1981) Enka Singer

en
ja
es
pt
Tamio Wakayama
en
ja
es
pt
Tamio Wakayama

Re-examining Identity

(1941-2018) Japanese Canadian photojournalist and activist

en
ja
es
pt
Francesca Yukari Biller
en
ja
es
pt
Francesca Yukari Biller

Culture is an important part of one's identity

Jewish Japanese American journalist

en
ja
es
pt
Toshiaki Toyoshima
en
ja
es
pt
Toshiaki Toyoshima

Difficulty of spreading authentic sushi (Japanese)

(b. 1949) Sushi chef. Owner of Sushi Gen restaurant in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo.

en
ja
es
pt
Toshiaki Toyoshima
en
ja
es
pt
Toshiaki Toyoshima

Teaching how to eat sushi (Japanese)

(b. 1949) Sushi chef. Owner of Sushi Gen restaurant in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo.

en
ja
es
pt
Michelle Yamashiro
en
ja
es
pt
Michelle Yamashiro

Okinawan Americans

Okinawan American whose parents are from Peru.

en
ja
es
pt
Kishi Bashi
en
ja
es
pt
Kishi Bashi

His Shin-Issei parents

(b. 1975) Musician, composer, and songwriter

en
ja
es
pt
Michelle Yamashiro
en
ja
es
pt
Michelle Yamashiro

General reasons why people left Japan for Peru

Okinawan American whose parents are from Peru.

en
ja
es
pt
Michelle Yamashiro
en
ja
es
pt
Michelle Yamashiro

Parents identification as Peruvian Okinawan

Okinawan American whose parents are from Peru.

en
ja
es
pt
Michelle Yamashiro
en
ja
es
pt
Michelle Yamashiro

Okinawan cultural appreciation

Okinawan American whose parents are from Peru.

en
ja
es
pt
Michelle Yamashiro
en
ja
es
pt
Michelle Yamashiro

Prejudice against Okinawans from mainland folks

Okinawan American whose parents are from Peru.

en
ja
es
pt
Michelle Yamashiro
en
ja
es
pt
Michelle Yamashiro

Working together in Okinawa using three languages

Okinawan American whose parents are from Peru.

en
ja
es
pt
Jimmy Naganuma
en
ja
es
pt
Jimmy Naganuma

Forcibly deported to the U.S. from Peru

(b. 1936) Japanese Peruvian incarcerated in Crystal City

en
ja
es
pt
Jimmy Naganuma
en
ja
es
pt
Jimmy Naganuma

Memories of childhood in Peru

(b. 1936) Japanese Peruvian incarcerated in Crystal City

en
ja
es
pt

Discover Nikkei Updates

NIKKEI CHRONICLES #13
Nikkei Names 2: Grace, Graça, Graciela, Megumi?
What’s in a name? Share the story of your name with our community. Submissions now open!
NIMA VOICES
Episode 16
June 25 (US) | June 26 (Japan)
Featured Nima:
Stan Kirk
Guest Host:
Yoko Murakawa
PROJECT UPDATES
NEW SITE DESIGN
See exciting new changes to Discover Nikkei. Find out what’s new and what’s coming soon!