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Experiences in the inland colony (Japanese)

(Japanese) Well, whenever I talk about the time I lived in the back-country, everyone thinks I’m lying. After I left Guatapará, I moved from farmland to farmland, and while I did that, the war broke out. World War I started the same year that I came over to Brazil. That continued on for five years, and the year that the war ended, the coffee harvest was lost due to harsh frost.

So because of that, there was no work to be done on the farmlands, so I moved over to the colony. It was a British-style ranch near Rio Preto. It was 24 kilometers inland from the station, and in order to get there, it took two whole days (laughs)! We would take an oxcart, and we go through these areas—areas without any roads. We just rely on the ox’s legs to lead us in the right direction. And then, there is this river on the way. And yes, there’s no bridge across the river. We would then have to move further upstream until we get to an area safe enough to cross. After we get to the other side, then we have to go this-a-way, that-a-way, and then continue on… Anyway, things like that would happen, and it would take two days to move 24 kilometers (laughs). But when we got there, it was a type of colony where mountain lions would lurk around at night. And at dawn and dusk, a flock of Arara (Amazona parakeets) would screech overhead (laughs). And back then, at night, monkeys—about fifty of them—would come close to the houses, screaming. That’s the kind of place I entered into (laughs).

It’s hard to believe such a story, isn’t it? Nowadays it’s become a story of the past… but I can say I had a good, a very good, experience in Brazil, and I am so grateful that I came to Brazil.


Brazil coffee Guatapará

Date:

Location: Brazil

Contributed by:

Interviewee Bio

Masao Kinoshita moved from Santos port and settled in the farmlands during World War I. He worked at a São Paulo coffee plantation with fellow Nikkei immigrants, and also helped carry on the development of the colonies. Facing a tough reality in an unfamiliar land, as well as a strong ambition to focus on education, he twice attempted to escape from the plantation, but failed. He was forced to return to the farmland. He was blessed with the opportunity to attend school in São Paulo a few years later, and moved to the city. While working, he attended school and studied law. Post-World War II, he was a central figure in leading a movement to help the Japanese community in Brazil recognize and accept defeat in the war, in opposition of the Emperor’s League (Shindo Renmei) which spread false propaganda declaring Japanese victory. (June 22, 2007)

Shunji Nishimura
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Shunji Nishimura

Going to Brazil to escape debt (Japanese)

(1911-2010) Founder of JACTO group

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Shunji Nishimura
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Shunji Nishimura

Early life in Brazil (Japanese)

(1911-2010) Founder of JACTO group

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Shunji Nishimura
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Shunji Nishimura

Learning skills by watching others work (Japanese)

(1911-2010) Founder of JACTO group

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Shunji Nishimura
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Shunji Nishimura

Repaying Brazil by educating the technicians (Japanese)

(1911-2010) Founder of JACTO group

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Ryoichi Kodama
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Ryoichi Kodama

Moving to Brazil wanting to see the world (Japanese)

Kasato-maru immigrants

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Ryoichi Kodama
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Ryoichi Kodama

Experiences in the farmlands (Japanese)

Kasato-maru immigrants

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Ryoichi Kodama
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Ryoichi Kodama

The first Japanese driver in Brazil (Japanese)

Kasato-maru immigrants

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Ryoichi Kodama
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Ryoichi Kodama

Affect of the World War II (Japanese)

Kasato-maru immigrants

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Hideto Futatsugui
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Hideto Futatsugui

Deciding to migrate to Brazil upon the influence of my Senpai (Japanese)

(b.1911) Issei educator 

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Hideto Futatsugui
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Hideto Futatsugui

Japanese education in Brazil (Japanese)

(b.1911) Issei educator 

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Hideto Futatsugui
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Hideto Futatsugui

Looking back on my 50 years in Brazil (Japanese)

(b.1911) Issei educator 

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Paulo Issamu Hirano
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Paulo Issamu Hirano

Moved to Japan as my dekasegi father called on me (Japanese)

(b. 1979) Sansei Nikkei Brazilian who lives in Oizumi-machi in Gunma prefecture. He runs his own design studio.

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Paulo Issamu Hirano
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Paulo Issamu Hirano

Facing hardships in Japan (Japanese)

(b. 1979) Sansei Nikkei Brazilian who lives in Oizumi-machi in Gunma prefecture. He runs his own design studio.

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